Monetized Installment Sale: Cash Today, Tax Today?

The U.S. Treasury recently issued its “Green Book”[1] which includes, among other items, a proposed increase in the capital gains rate up to 43.4%[2] for taxpayers with incomes over $1 million as well as an elimination of like-kind exchanges where gain deferral will exceed $500,000. This means that taxpayers will be subject to significantly higher…
Read More

Mississippi Supreme Court Strikes Down Medical Marijuana

Gray Edmondson previously discussed the tax considerations for Initiative Measure 65 (“Initiate 65”) and medical marijuana in Mississippi following the approval by a majority of voters in November 2020. However, it appears that Mississippians will have a while to wait before medical marijuana is actually legalized in Mississippi. On May 14, 2021, the Mississippi Supreme…
Read More

Entities and the Performance of Personal Services: Berry

Owners of legal entities typically establish those entities to achieve certain planning goals, be them tax, asset protection, contract management, or other reasons. Key to accomplishing those goals is that courts respect the entity planning structure that is established. In the recent Tax Court opinion of Berry v. Commissioner[1], we see a taxpayer who intended…
Read More

Insult to Injury – Properly Documenting and Taking Bad-Luck Deductions

In a recent case involving taxpayers Ronnie S. Baum and Teresa K. Baum, the IRS disallowed many deductions, including deductions for theft losses and worthless securities.[1] This case is a quick and helpful reminder of some common deduction rules. Fact Summary This case relates to events occurring between years 2010 and 2019. The tax years…
Read More

FBAR Penalties Not Subject to Pay to Play Rule

In a recent case out of the United States Court of Federal Claims, the Court held that the plaintiff was not required to pay the full amount of the assessed Report of Foreign Bank and Financial Accounts (“FBAR”) penalty in order for the Court to have jurisdiction over a suit for refund.[1] The Court of…
Read More

Update on President Joe Biden’s Proposed Tax Policies

Introduction Last year I discussed President Joe Biden’s Proposed Tax Policy For Individuals, Charles J. Allen discussed the tax plans of the democratic presidential candidates, and Josh Sage discussed some of Biden’s potential changes. We are now a few months into President Biden’s tenure and the first ripples of tax reform can be felt by…
Read More

Substance over Form: Friend of the Taxpayer?

In the recent Complex Media[1] case, the Tax Court addressed a taxpayer’s ability to recast the form of a transaction under the “substance over form” doctrine. Since taxpayers typically control the form their transactions take, tax decisions routinely stick taxpayers with the consequences of that form. Some courts have precluded taxpayers from even raising substance…
Read More

Fashion Designer Denied Research Credits

As it turns out, fashion design will not usually constitute qualified research for the purposes of qualifying for the research credit under Section 41 of the Internal Revenue Code. In a recent case from the Tax Court, taxpayer, Leon Max, failed to convince a sympathetic court that expenses related to his fashion design process should…
Read More

Student Loans – Not Dischargeable, Even If Made to Family

When an individual files for bankruptcy, they are released from personal liability for certain specified types of debts. However, for public policy reasons, Congress has determined that certain debts can’t be discharged by filing for bankruptcy.[1] One of the most well-known non-dischargeable liabilities is student loan debt.[2] The recent U.S. Bankruptcy Court case, In re…
Read More